As Above ~ So Below: A Channeled, Assisted, Unfolding Story

5 Aug

(Skip It)

Author: Jeffrey M. Borowski

Genre: Fiction

First Published: 2012

Page Count: 180

Type: Paperback

Film/ TV Adaptation: No

Rating: 1/5 Stars

With little action to move the plot, this book can’t seem to decide whether it’s a self-help guide, autobiographical account of the author’s everyday life, or a fictional tale of a paranormal encounter.

__________________Positives__________________

*Vivid descriptions

___________________Negatives_____________________

*Numerous grammatical errors     *Distracting writing style     *Story has no focus

Nothing will come to you if you do not put in the effort to achieve it.” The book tells the story of Jeff and his wife Brennie, and their life in the countryside home they purchase after the success of his books. Occupying the house is a friendly spirit named Michelle who is supposed to guide them on their life journey to be better people and to try to make the world a better place.

It is clear that Borowski has talent when it comes to describing anything from the appearance of freshly fallen snow, to the taste of freshly brewed coffee. The reader can smell, taste, see, and hear every piece of the author’s story. Borowski’s skill in being able to paint a picture of the setting and all that happens is fairly impressive since he seems to grasp the exact feeling one would experience in what he is describing.

After that, there isn’t much I can say about this book that is positive. The story is very confusing because nothing really happens. Even though there is the appearance of a spirit guide who is supposed to help the characters evolve into better people, this is the only element of the book that provides any movement of the plot. Otherwise, the reader is left with descriptions of everyday events like driving to the grocery store or making dinner for their visiting family members. Every now and then, the story will break off in tangents from the main character about things like religion or poverty which feel disconnected from the story in a preaching from a soap box with good intentions manner. The main character tries to label these tangents as mere illustrations of his opinion but they still come off as judgemental at some points, even though his tangents usually center around the theme of avoiding being judgemental. Another major distraction was the poor grammar that popped up way more often than it should in a book, and that’s not counting the intentional misuse of punctuation and misspelling of words. This symbol “~” is used frequently, magical is spelled “magickal,” and the author creates words such as “approachment” to move his story along. Yes, doing any of these things would be frowned upon because it’s not conventional in the sense of what is acceptable in the publishing world, and unless you’re an incredibly famous and critically acclaimed author I don’t know if I would have the guts to challenge that. But ultimately, these additions to the story are incredibly distracting to the reader and hurt rather than help the story. In some cases, I would’ve thought the author was trying to use this style as a gimmick, but I don’t think that’s the case, which makes their inclusion in the tale even more distressing. The book would have much more credibility if it followed the basic conventions of writing to more fluidly bring its story to life.

From start to finish, I failed to understand what I was supposed to take away from the book and ultimately, what its point was. The story was written with good intentions and clearly with the goal to leave the reader with some deep message that would hopefully change them for the better, but I’m still left completely clueless as to what that message is. Two of the main character’s messages were to be content with who you are as a person and to do what you want and not let anyone else’s opinion dictate how you live your life. Even though this book was not to my taste, I did follow both of these messages in this review. Maybe I did take something away from the read?

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